Plesiosaurs and Pliosaurus and More!
The results of 8 field seasons worth of exploration and excavation in Svalbard, Norway have been published in the Norwegian Journal of Geology, featuring the work of UAMN Earth Sciences Curator Pat Druckenmiller and Collection Manager Julie Rousseau.
(via Norwegian Journal of Geology | Current issue)

Plesiosaurs and Pliosaurus and More!

The results of 8 field seasons worth of exploration and excavation in Svalbard, Norway have been published in the Norwegian Journal of Geology, featuring the work of UAMN Earth Sciences Curator Pat Druckenmiller and Collection Manager Julie Rousseau.

(via Norwegian Journal of Geology | Current issue)

THE ENDS OF THE ARCTIC - The museum’s earth sciences department has completed another summer of field work. The research took them to Alaska’s North Slope, where work continues to find evidence of the dinosaurs that lived in this polar region millions of years ago, when it was located even further north above the arctic circle.

Curator Pat Druckenmiller and Collection Manager Julie Rousseau also traveled to Svalbard in Northern Norway to complete the eighth season of work investigating ancient marine reptiles. This plesiosaur skeleton was the last fossil excavated and it proved to be a stellar find, the most complete Colymbosaurus and the first time a skull was discovered at the end of the creature’s 15-foot-long body.

THEY FOUND THE SKULL! Our Earth Sciences Curator Pat Druckenmiller was part of this expedition in Norway that solved the mystery of the Colymbosaurus, an animal first found in Great Britain 150 years ago. But until now, no one had ever seen the skull of this kind of plesiosaur.
"I have never worked with a skull this fragile," Pat says.
(via Sea Monsters of the North: Day 11-Skull Discovered at Last! – News Watch)

THEY FOUND THE SKULL! Our Earth Sciences Curator Pat Druckenmiller was part of this expedition in Norway that solved the mystery of the Colymbosaurus, an animal first found in Great Britain 150 years ago. But until now, no one had ever seen the skull of this kind of plesiosaur.

"I have never worked with a skull this fragile," Pat says.

(via Sea Monsters of the North: Day 11-Skull Discovered at Last! – News Watch)

Recent paleontological fieldwork in the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, Norway reveals the presence of a rich assemblage of marine reptiles - plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs. To date, approximately 60 individual skeletal occurrences have been mapped, of which 15 have been fully excavated. Individual skeletons range from partially to fully articulated, while bone preservation is variable and often dependent on factors relating to current permafrost conditions.
An artist’s rendition of a plesiosaur, a common group of marine reptiles in the Western Interior Seaway of North America, a thousand mile sea which extended from the Arctic to the Gulf of Mexico 74 million years ago. Artist: Ken Olson

Recent paleontological fieldwork in the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, Norway reveals the presence of a rich assemblage of marine reptiles - plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs. To date, approximately 60 individual skeletal occurrences have been mapped, of which 15 have been fully excavated. Individual skeletons range from partially to fully articulated, while bone preservation is variable and often dependent on factors relating to current permafrost conditions.

An artist’s rendition of a plesiosaur, a common group of marine reptiles in the Western Interior Seaway of North America, a thousand mile sea which extended from the Arctic to the Gulf of Mexico 74 million years ago. Artist: Ken Olson